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Strong Yet Feminine Profile: Hazel Butterfield, TV & Radio Presenter

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Hazel Butterfield, TV, Radio Presenter & Blogger, tells us how she became an entrepreneur at the age of 12, and how her grandma and mum were the ultimate Strong Yet Feminine role models, who inspired her to be the amazing lady she is today.
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Strong Yet Feminine Profile: Emaese Jegede of MSA Be Inspired

Posted by Sally Lane on

Strong Yet Feminine Profiles are a series of interviews, showcasing ambitious women who are striving to follow their passion. Many are working full time and pursuing their dream on the side, some have already taken the leap, and share their experiences (the good and the bad!).

Any career decision is difficult, but making a leap into a different field, in order to pursue a true passion, has to be one of the most inspiring stories. I know, for me, hearing stories like these were crucial to bolstering my confidence when considering my own change in direction.

Sally Lane Jewellery is designed for exactly such Strong Yet Feminine women…the fierceness of the edgy triangle jewellery is the perfect accessory to these confident, go get ‘em ladies...all power to you!

Emaese

Emaese Jegede, Owner of the MSA Be Inspired blog tells us how she manages her GP work part-time so that she has time to pursue her creative passions.

Is that an Aussie accent I detect?

Well done, people don’t often detect that! I was born in Nigeria but I grew up in Australia until my first year of University, then I moved to Canada to finish my first degree in biology. I was there for 4 years and then got into med school and moved to the UK. I’ve been here for 14 years now, I didn’t think I’d stay this long. So yes, my accent is a bit mixed!

So you are a doctor?!!

Yes, I’m a GP but not full time anymore. I qualified as a GP in 2012 and after that I locumed for a while. Then I got a job as a salaried GP in a GP surgery and I hated it, I lasted 7 weeks. It wasn’t a great surgery to be fair and I was finding significant clinical mistakes every day; it was one of those GP surgeries that might end up on the news for medical malpractice! After that I decided, “You know what, I’m going to take some time out and think about what I really want.” I wanted a career that was tailor made to fit my interest in medicine and my creative interests as well.

When I left GP training, I thought I was on my way to becoming a GP partner, working full time, specialising in women’s health and lots of other things. But I realised that once you get locked into that rat race mentality of what “success” looks like it’s very difficult to get out of it, and there is no energy left to be creative at the end of a week. I didn’t want to go through my life with any regrets.

So I did an Interior design diploma and a sewing course, which I loved. Then I was asked to help with make-up for my sister’s wedding; I did my best, but I knew it wasn’t great. When I got home after the wedding I started watching YouTube videos and just fell in love with make-up! From there I did a photography course, so that I could capture all the things that I created by myself. The final assignment for my photography course, involved presenting a photo essay to the rest of the class. I decided to photograph all my loves (medicine, food, arts & crafts, and make-up), and that assignment gave me the idea for my blog (www.msabeinspired.com)! I wanted to bring it all together and inspire others to be creative. I also went on to complete a formal makeup course.

I’m doing GP work 75% of my week and then I have fun being creative the rest of the week!

What inspired your interviews?

I love Oprah, she’s one of my role models and she really inspires me. She created a programme called ‘Masterclass’ where she interviewed famous people about their lives and I gained so much from watching it.  I decided that I wanted to learn from the journeys of other entrepreneurs, so I started interviewing the founders of small creative businesses and it went from there.

Were you creative when you were younger?

I think creativity was always in me, I did art up to year 10 before I went into the sciences. All throughout medical school, I would paint or draw in my spare time and that was probably the extent of it. After finishing my degree I had more time on my hands, so I started exploring and have been able to develop my creativity further. I believe that creativity resides within everyone, but you have to take steps to nurture and develop it.

So it was never a consideration to follow a more creative career?

Studying medicine was my choice and I don’t regret it, but I did come from a very academic family and I think my Dad would have freaked out if I’d said I was going become a make-up artist after I finished high school. But now that I’ve got a medical degree behind me, it feels like a luxury to choose a creative career at I’m passionate about.

What hours do you work?

I work mostly evenings and some daytime shifts. It’s nice to have the day free; you can wake up a little later or meet a friend for lunch. Life feels so much more relaxed and I feel really lucky to have that versus a 14 hour work day.

What’s next?

At the moment I’m developing a Bridal makeup look book, as this is something I really want to get into.

The blog is ticking along and I’m also working on creating YouTube videos which has been a challenge but I’m loving doing that. I want to create ‘how to’ videos (for example, how to embellish a top) and also eventually publish some of the interviews that I have conducted with creative entrepreneurs.

Medically, I’m still figuring it out. I’m not sure that I’ve quite found my home yet within medicine. General Practice is obviously broad and you can specialise in pretty much anything. I’ve always loved minor surgery, so I think that is the route I might take next. I guess it’s the more creative side of medicine!

What does that entail? Sounds intense!

You can do a diploma, which is the longer route, or you can do a short course over a few days and then work with a mentor to develop your skills before practicing independently. I’ve done it before as a trainee; it involves removing things like sebaceous cysts or ingrowing toenails, and it’s really good fun!

I’ll take your word for that!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Strong Yet Feminine Profile: Fleur Christacos of Fleur of England

Posted by Sally Lane on

Strong Yet Feminine Profiles are a series of interviews, showcasing ambitious women who are striving to follow their passion. Many are working full time and pursuing their dream on the side, some have already taken the leap, and share their experiences (the good and the bad!).

Any career decision is difficult, but making a leap into a different field, in order to pursue a true passion, has to be one of the most inspiring stories. I know, for me, hearing stories like these were crucial to bolstering my confidence when considering my own change in direction.

Sally Lane Jewellery is designed for exactly such Strong Yet Feminine women…the fierceness of the edgy triangle jewellery is the perfect accessory to these confident, go get ‘em ladies...all power to you!

 Strong Yet Feminine Fleur Christacos

Fleur Christacos, Owner of Fleur of England, shares how she followed her passion from a young age to create the business she has today, how she cut up her mum's clothes to create her first designs for Cindy (does Cindy actually help create Entrepreneurs?!) and how finances are the most important first step.

It looks like you went straight from Uni to starting Fleur of England – what gave you the drive to start your own business at such a young age?

For as long as I can remember, I have always wanted to run my own business. I come from a family of entrepreneurs so that’s what we do! Designing lingerie has always been a passion of mine so creating my own business was always my end goal.

When did you first have the idea for a lingerie business and where did that come from?

At age 9 I told my parents I wanted to be a corset designer, I used to cut up my mum’s clothes to make Cindy dresses. Even back then I would always choose the light weight fabrics. Obviously, she didn’t like me doing this so we started visiting local jumble sales together so I could choose items and fabrics myself.

My nick name was Flirty Fleur so lingerie was an obvious choice!

What were your first steps, 16 years ago?

The first step was finance, and then once that had been sorted out the next step was working out how to manufacture my designs. I studied fashion marketing at university so the marketing and design is natural for me.

Female empowerment is key to your brand, tell us about your experience in business as a woman...who have been your female role models?

The lingerie industry is a wonderful industry, it is very intimate and friendly, but as with any business, you’ve still got to be tough to survive. You need to be able to communicate effectively with strength passion and compassion. I surround myself with good people who are highly skilled. My female role models would be Stella McCartney and Helen Mirren.

Both strongly feminine.

Did you ever feel like giving up and if so what spurred you on?

Yes, a few times, especially when I had the babies and I was so sleep deprived. I went back to work when my first son was 3 weeks old, very tough. My mother helped me so much; she is a strong woman who always taught me to be independent but caring. I have an amazing husband who is the best chef in the world. Having a great support network behind me really spurred me on to continue growing my business.

What has been the biggest surprise over the years?

I should trust myself over anything, my instinct is strong.

What has been your favourite moment in business?

My favourite moment to date has to be when I introduced my mother to Princess Ann when I won ‘New UK Exporter of the Year’.

What is the piece of advice you would give to anyone starting their own business?

Sort your finances out and invest in good people.

Can you nominate another inspirational woman in your network who should have their own Strong Yet Feminine profile?

Yes, Lucy Ann, she is my number 2, and my technical and production executive - I couldn’t do it without her. She is a mum too and is such an incredible person.

 

TO WIN A THE BOUDOIR SET OF FLEUR OF ENGLAND LINGERIE, A SALLY LANE JEWELLERY BEAUTY WITHIN PENDANT, AND A COPY OF "HOW TO RAISE A FEMINIST: BRINGING UP CONFIDENT KIDS WHO COULD CHANGE THE WORLD" BY ALLISON VALE AND VICTORIA RALFS, CLICK HERE

 

 

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International Women's Day - Tag your Strong Yet Feminine Inspiration to Win!

Posted by Sally Lane on

Celebrate International Women's Day by sharing your Strong Yet Feminine Inspiration!
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Strong Yet Feminine Profile: Caroline Henne, CMO of Wolf & Badger

Posted by Sally Lane on

Caroline Henne, CMO of Wolf and Badger (for 3 days a week), shares how her decision to leave a major corporate and become self-employed in order to explore multiple passions, has made her the richest she has ever been, despite earning less!

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